Rainbow Pre-School


Name Rainbow Pre-School
Ofsted Inspection Rating Outstanding
Inspection Date 28 November 2019
Address Bookham Baptist Church, Lower Road, Bookham, LEATHERHEAD, Surrey, KT23 4DH
Phone Number 01372 811313 or 07905 358910
Type Childcare on Non-Domestic Premises, Sessional day care
Gender Mixed
Catchment Area Information Available No
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

What is it like to attend this early years setting?

The provision is outstanding

Children feel extremely secure through the wonderfully strong relationships they have with staff. They develop high levels of confidence and eagerly take on challenges when their key person is near. For example, children who once lacked confidence in their physical abilities now challenge themselves to climb up steps to reach higher slides. Children engage intensively in their play. They apply highly effective problem-solving skills as they explore and investigate. For example, when using a water tray with different levels, they give huge thought to how they can make balls in the top level float. They voice their ideas with great eloquence and experiment with different mathematical concepts, including quantity. Staff continually support them to build on their ideas even further by using exemplary teaching skills.Children benefit significantly from the immense passion and commitment that the manager applies to her role. She has an exceptionally strong ethos which is to ensure children are interested in life and learning, and that they become confident in themselves and their capabilities. The exceedingly motivated staff bring this ethos into everything they do and continually support children to reach the extremely high expectations they have for them. For example, they ensure that children understand exactly what they have achieved by giving constructive praise. When a child blows into a structure they have made from straws, staff notice exactly his aims and praise him for achieving these. He beams with pride at his achievement.

What does the early years setting do well and what does it need to do better?

nStaff understand extensively children’s backgrounds and home lives. This enables them to provide children with new experiences and to develop their knowledge significantly. For example, a visit from a travelling farm has allowed children to learn about farm animals in a wonderfully interactive and exciting manner. The manager does everything she can to provide for children’s well-being and developmental needs fully. She has recently sourced land that she is using brilliantly to enhance the opportunities for children to engage in outdoor play.nChildren behave impeccably. Staff teach them skills that empower them to solve conflicts positively and to manage their behaviour maturely. For instance, when children both want the same magnifying glass, they work out how to solve the problem themselves. They decide to play hide and seek with them to take turns. Children learn to understand feelings and think about the consequences of their behaviour. They demonstrate this when they realise that running with torches puts them at risk of hurting themselves and decide to walk.nThe manager acts incisively to maximise the learning for children. She hasprovided excellent training opportunities to enable staff to better support children’s developing communication skills. This includes through working in exceptionally close partnership with a speech therapist who finds out what support children need the most. She provides staff with extremely effective techniques that they put in to practice skilfully to greatly boost children’s progress in communication and language.nChildren have wonderful opportunities to develop skills that will support them in their future learning. The manager uses her extensive understanding of how children learn to provide highly effective opportunities for children to develop early reading and writing skills. For example, she has implemented a system where children recognise symbols before they recognise their names. They learn that marks carry meaning and draw pictures of their symbols. This evolves as children progress and begin to show interest in the letters. Children engage in a wealth of activities that help them to develop hand strength ready to be writers. This includes using hammers with care and precision to tap shapes on to cork boards.nThe manager ensures that every child meets their full potential. She applies exceptional focus on providing extra support for children with special educational needs and/or disabilities. This includes by working in extremely close partnership with a range of other professionals. Due to the prompt and effective action that the manager takes, gaps in progress close rapidly.nParents understand precisely how they can support their children’s learning at home. Staff eagerly share with them the strategies they use and carry out workshops to ensure exceedingly high levels of continuity. They have excellent relationships with the parents, who feel hugely supported.nThe manager successfully ensures that her staff are incredibly motivated and that they meet her high expectations precisely. This is evident as even the newest staff members embed the manager’s ethos in their practice. She provides excellent opportunities for staff to develop new skills and supports them extensively throughout their practice by sharing her own knowledge to improve their skills. Staff love working in the setting and feel that their well-being is considered greatly.

Safeguarding

The arrangements for safeguarding are effective.Safeguarding is at the core of everything the staff and manager do. They work very closely with families to ensure children’s overall well-being. This includes by helping parents to access help and providing great moral support. The manager ensures that staff understand fully how to recognise if a child’s welfare is at risk. Staff demonstrate a confident understanding of what to do if they have a concern. Children learn how to keep themselves safe. For example, they show an excellent understanding of the rules when they walk to the local school and learn about road safety as they are involved in deciding when it is safe to cross.